Tag: user_experience


'Designing the Search Experience' Available on Amazon

January 19th, 2013 — 11:53am

Design­ing the Search Expe­ri­ence: The Infor­ma­tion Archi­tec­ture of Dis­cov­ery is offi­cially avail­able for pur­chase from Ama­zon — con­grat­u­la­tions to authors Tony Russell-Rose and Tyler Tate. As I men­tioned in July, I was invited to con­tribute a piece. You can read my con­tri­bu­tion in chap­ter four, “Modes of Search and Discovery”.

Now, go buy the book!

Comment » | Language of Discovery, User Experience (UX)

Slides for UXLX talk "The Language of Discovery: A Grammar for Designing Big Data Interactions"

June 3rd, 2012 — 12:40pm

I’ve posted the slides from my UXLX talk on the Lan­guage of Dis­cov­ery. Thanks to a few days spent fea­tured on the slideshare home­page, they’ve clocked over 60,000 views in the past week!  In com­bi­na­tion with the buzz from the audi­ence for the talk, I think this shows there is broader aware­ness and appetite for answers to the ques­tion of how design­ers will make big data acces­si­ble and ‘engageable’.

From the prac­ti­cal per­spec­tive, if you’re look­ing for a way to describe dis­cov­ery and sense mak­ing needs and activ­i­ties, there’s no bet­ter resource than this.  And the LOD is well-grounded from the method­olog­i­cal and research per­spec­tives, hav­ing roots in HCIR, cog­ni­tive sci­ence, and a num­ber of other aca­d­e­mic dis­ci­plines that con­tribute to the toolkit for under­stand­ing human inter­ac­tion with infor­ma­tion and dis­cov­ery activity.

I hope the lan­guage of dis­cov­ery is part of that big­ger pic­ture of how cre­ators of inter­ac­tions and defin­ers of expe­ri­ences shape the new tools peo­ple use in the Age of Insight.

The Lan­guage of Dis­cov­ery: Design­ing Big Data Inter­ac­tions from Joe Laman­tia

Also, the Lanyrd page for the talk aggre­gates the slides, sketch notes, and point­ers to some other resources.

Comment » | Language of Discovery, User Experience (UX)

Presenting "A Taxonomy of Enterprise Search" at EUROHCIR

June 6th, 2011 — 8:13am

I’m pleased to be pre­sent­ing ‘A Tax­on­omy of Enter­prise Search’ at the upcom­ing Euro­HCIR work­shop, part of the 2011 HCI con­fer­ence in the UK.  Co-authored with Tony Russell-Rose of UXLabs, and Mark Bur­rell here at Endeca, this is our first pub­li­ca­tion of some of the very excit­ing work we’re doing to under­stand and describe dis­cov­ery activ­i­ties in enter­prise set­tings, and do so within a changed and broader fram­ing than tra­di­tional infor­ma­tion retrieval.  The paper builds on work I’ve done pre­vi­ously on under­stand­ing and defin­ing infor­ma­tion needs and pat­terns of infor­ma­tion retrieval activ­ity, while work­ing on search and dis­cov­ery prob­lems as part of larger user expe­ri­ence archi­tec­ture efforts.

Here’s the abstract of the paper:

Clas­sic IR (infor­ma­tion retrieval) is pred­i­cated on the notion of users search­ing for infor­ma­tion in order to sat­isfy a par­tic­u­lar “infor­ma­tion need”. How­ever, it is now accepted that much of what we rec­og­nize as search behav­iour is often not infor­ma­tional per se. For exam­ple, Broder (2002) has shown that the need under­ly­ing a given web search could in fact be nav­i­ga­tional (e.g. to find a par­tic­u­lar site or known item) or trans­ac­tional (e.g. to find a sites through which the user can trans­act, e.g. through online shop­ping, social media, etc.). Sim­i­larly, Rose & Levin­son (2004) have iden­ti­fied con­sump­tion of online resources as a fur­ther cat­e­gory of search behav­iour and query intent.

In this paper, we extend this work to the enter­prise con­text, exam­in­ing the needs and behav­iours of indi­vid­u­als across a range of search and dis­cov­ery sce­nar­ios within var­i­ous types of enter­prise. We present an ini­tial tax­on­omy of “dis­cov­ery modes”, and dis­cuss some ini­tial impli­ca­tions for the design of more effec­tive search and dis­cov­ery plat­forms and tools.

There’s a con­sid­er­able amount of research avail­able on infor­ma­tion retrieval — even within a com­par­a­tively new dis­ci­pline like HCIR, focused on the human to sys­tem inter­ac­tion aspects of IR — but I think it’s the attempt to define an activ­ity cen­tered gram­mar for inter­act­ing with infor­ma­tion that makes our approach worth exam­in­ing.  The HCIR events in the U.S. (and now Europe) blend aca­d­e­mic and prac­ti­tioner per­spec­tives, so are an appro­pri­ate audi­ence for our pro­posed vocab­u­lary of dis­cov­ery activ­ity ‘modes’ that’s based on a sub­stan­tial body of data col­lected and ana­lyzed dur­ing solu­tion design and deploy­ment engagements.

I’ll post the paper itself once the pro­ceed­ings are available.

 

 

 

Comment » | Language of Discovery, User Experience (UX), User Research

The Architecture of Discovery: Slides from Discover Conference 2011

April 16th, 2011 — 1:11pm

Endeca invites cus­tomers, part­ners and lead­ing mem­bers of the broader search and dis­cov­ery tech­nol­ogy and solu­tions com­mu­ni­ties to meet annu­ally, and show­case the most inter­est­ing and excit­ing work in the field of dis­cov­ery.  As lead for the UX team that designs Endeca’s dis­cov­ery prod­ucts, I shared some of our recent work on pat­terns in the struc­ture of dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions, as well as best prac­tices in infor­ma­tion design and visu­al­iza­tion that we use to drive prod­uct def­i­n­i­tion and design for Endeca’s Lat­i­tude Dis­cov­ery Framework.

This mate­r­ial is use­ful for pro­gram and project man­agers and busi­ness ana­lysts defin­ing require­ments for dis­cov­ery solu­tions and appli­ca­tions, UX and sys­tem archi­tects craft­ing high-level struc­tures and address­ing long-term growth, inter­ac­tion design­ers and tech­ni­cal devel­op­ers defin­ing and build­ing infor­ma­tion work­spaces at a fine grain, and

There are three major sec­tions: the first presents some of our tools for iden­ti­fy­ing and under­stand­ing people’s needs and goals for dis­cov­ery in terms of activ­ity (the Lan­guage of Dis­cov­ery as we call it), the sec­ond brings together screen-level, appli­ca­tion level, and user sce­nario / use-case level pat­terns we’ve observed in the appli­ca­tions cre­ated to meet those needs, and the final sec­tion shares con­densed best prac­tices and fun­da­men­tal prin­ci­ples for infor­ma­tion design and visu­al­iza­tion based on aca­d­e­mic research dis­ci­plines such as cog­ni­tive sci­ence and infor­ma­tion retrieval.

It’s no coin­ci­dence that these sec­tions reflect the appli­ca­tion of the core UX dis­ci­plines of user research, infor­ma­tion archi­tec­ture, and inter­ac­tion design to the ques­tion of “who will need to encounter infor­ma­tion for some end, and in what kind of expe­ri­ence will they encounter it”.  This flow and order­ing is delib­er­ate; it demon­strates on two lev­els the results of our own efforts apply­ing the UX per­spec­tive to the ques­tions inher­ent in cre­at­ing dis­cov­ery tools, and shares some of the tools, insights, tem­plates, and resources we use to shape the plat­form used to cre­ate dis­cov­ery expe­ri­ences across diverse industries.

Ses­sion outline

  1. Under­stand­ing User Needs
  2. Design Pat­terns for Dis­cov­ery Applications
  3. Design Prin­ci­ples and Gudielines for Infor­ma­tion Inter­ac­tion and Visualization

Ses­sion description

How can you har­ness the power and flex­i­bil­ity of Lat­i­tude to cre­ate use­ful, usable, and com­pelling dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions for enter­prise dis­cov­ery work­ers? This ses­sion goes beyond the tech­nol­ogy to explore how you can apply fun­da­men­tal prin­ci­ples of infor­ma­tion design and visu­al­iza­tion, ana­lyt­ics best prac­tices and user inter­face design pat­terns to com­pose effec­tive and com­pelling dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions that opti­mize user dis­cov­ery, suc­cess, engage­ment, & adoption.”

The pat­terns are prod­uct spe­cific in that they show how to com­pose screens and appli­ca­tions using the pre­de­fined com­po­nents in the Dis­cov­ery Frame­work library.  How­ever, many of the product-specific com­po­nents are built to address com­mon or recur­ring needs for inter­ac­tion with infor­ma­tion via well-known mech­a­nisms such as search, fil­ter­ing, nav­i­ga­tion, visu­al­iza­tion, and pre­sen­ta­tion of data.  In other words, even if you’re not using the lit­eral Dis­cov­ery Frame­work com­po­nent library to com­pose your spe­cific infor­ma­tion analy­sis work­space, you’ll find these pat­terns rel­e­vant at work­space and appli­ca­tion lev­els of scale.

The deeper story of these pat­terns is in demon­strat­ing the evo­lu­tion of dis­cov­ery and analy­sis appli­ca­tions over time.  Typ­i­cally, dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions begin by offer­ing users a general-purpose work­space that sat­is­fies a wide range of inter­ac­tion tasks in an approx­i­mate fash­ion.  Over time, via suc­ces­sive expan­sions in the the scope and vari­ety of data they present, and the dis­cov­ery and analy­sis capa­bil­i­ties they pro­vide, dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions grow to include sev­eral dif­fer­ent types of work­spaces that indi­vid­u­ally address dis­tinct sets of needs for visu­al­iza­tion and sense mak­ing by using very dif­fer­ent com­bi­na­tions of com­po­nents.  As a com­pos­ite, these func­tional and infor­ma­tion­ally diverse work­spaces span the full range of inter­ac­tion needs for dif­fer­ing types of users.

I hope you find this toolkit and col­lec­tion of pat­terns and infor­ma­tion design prin­ci­ples use­ful.  What are some of the resources you’re using to take on these challenges?

User Expe­ri­ence Archi­tec­ture For Dis­cov­ery Appli­ca­tions from Joe Laman­tia

Comment » | Dashboards & Portals, Enterprise, Information Architecture, User Experience (UX)

Video of 'Social Interaction Design for Augmented Reality' from TWAB 2010

July 2nd, 2010 — 1:34am

The good peo­ple at Chi Nether­lands just posted video of my talk “Play­ing Well With Oth­ers: Inter­ac­tion Design and Social Design for Aug­mented Real­ity” at the Web and Beyond 2010 here in Ams­ter­dam in June.  It’s couched as a col­lec­tion of design prin­ci­ples for the oncom­ing cat­e­gory of social aug­mented inter­ac­tions made pos­si­ble by the new medium of aug­mented real­ity.  But this talk is also a call to action for all mak­ers of expe­ri­ences for the emerg­ing engage­ment space of every­ware to focus on the human and the humane per­spec­tives as we explore the new inter­ac­tions made possible.

The out­line of the talk is roughly:

  1. Overview of aug­mented reality
  2. Social inter­ac­tion per­spec­tive on cur­rent AR experiences
  3. Def­i­n­i­tion of ‘social aug­mented experiences’
  4. Com­mon inter­ac­tion design pat­terns for AR
  5. Social ‘anti-patterns’ lim­it­ing design of aug­mented experiences
  6. Design prin­ci­ples for social aug­mented experiences

(The audio qual­ity is quite good, and the cam­era­man cap­tured most of the slides nicely — so this is a record­ing worth watching.)

This year’s TWAB fea­tured sev­eral talks on aug­mented real­ity, ubiq­ui­tous com­put­ing and related top­ics; you’ll find record­ings of these on the Chi Ned­er­land Vimeo chan­nel: http://vimeo.com/chinederland

Many thanks to the orga­niz­ers and vol­un­teers for putting on such a well-run event!

TWAB2010: Joe Laman­tia — Play­ing well with oth­ers: inter­ac­tion design and social design for aug­mented real­ity from Chi Ned­er­land on Vimeo.

1 comment » | Augmented Reality, Everyware, User Experience (UX)

Social Interaction Design for Augmented Reality at the Web and Beyond

June 3rd, 2010 — 9:05am

Thanks to all who came to the Muziekge­bouw on a lovely early sum­mer day to talk about the emerg­ing engage­ment space of social aug­mented expe­ri­ences for the third edi­tion of The Web And Beyond con­fer­ence in Amsterdam.

For ref­er­ence, here’s the ses­sion descrip­tion from the offi­cial program:

Aug­mented real­ity blends the real world and the Inter­net in real time, mak­ing many new kinds of prox­im­ity, con­text, and loca­tion based expe­ri­ences pos­si­ble for indi­vid­u­als and groups. Despite these many pos­si­bil­i­ties, we know from his­tory that the long term value and impact of aug­mented real­ity for most peo­ple will depend on how well these expe­ri­ences inte­grate with ordi­nary social set­tings, and sup­port every­day inter­ac­tions. Yet the inter­ac­tion pat­terns and behav­ior we see in cur­rent AR expe­ri­ences seem almost ‘anti-social’ by design. This is an impor­tant gap that design must close in order to cre­ate suc­cess­ful AR offer­ings. In other words, much like chil­dren going to school for the first time, AR must to learn to ‘play well with oth­ers’ to be valu­able and suc­cess­ful. This pre­sen­ta­tion reviews the inter­ac­tion design pat­terns com­mon to aug­mented real­ity, sug­gests tools to help under­stand and improve the ’social matu­rity’ of AR prod­ucts and appli­ca­tions, and shares design prin­ci­ples for cre­at­ing gen­uinely social aug­mented expe­ri­ences that inte­grate well with human social set­tings and interactions.

Comment » | Augmented Reality, User Experience (UX)

Geek to Chic: The Cultural Branding of Augmented Reality Experiences

August 29th, 2009 — 2:57am

Since I wrote about the user expe­ri­ence of aug­mented real­ity less than two weeks ago, the most impor­tant devel­op­ment is the arrival of aug­mented iPhone apps (unof­fi­cially for the moment, offi­cially in September).

Why is this so impor­tant, when Wik­i­tude and other AR Android apps have been avail­able for almost a year?  Bring­ing aug­mented real­ity to the iPhone changes the cul­tural assump­tions made about AR expe­ri­ences as a class of offer­ing. Endors­ing AR expe­ri­ences for iPhone users moves aug­mented real­ity from the geek realm of Android and Google, to the chic world of Apple.  Cul­tur­ally, the assump­tions we make about the new prod­ucts and ser­vices from Apple and Google are dri­ven largely by the dif­fer­ences in way we per­ceive the two brands.  Apple is chic, while Google is geek.

Look­ing Ahead

Con­nect­ing the Apple brand to aug­mented expe­ri­ences will per­suade many peo­ple to try out AR.  Yet as I’ve said, and many oth­ers as well, get­ting the user expe­ri­ence of aug­mented real­ity ‘right’ is absolutely the crit­i­cal ele­ment to the long term via­bil­ity of this new class of expe­ri­ences.  This entails two efforts.

First, design­ers must refine the expe­ri­ences offered by all those AR appli­ca­tions based on the four clas­sic inter­ac­tion pat­terns known so far — Head-Up Dis­play, Tri­corder, Holochess, and X-ray Vision.  Two fac­tors make refine­ment essen­tial: com­pe­ti­tion from other AR offer­ings that reduces the nov­elty value of your expe­ri­ence, and increased ‘load’ on the UX in the form of actual use for every­day pur­poses in the com­plex set­ting of real life.  Think about try­ing to choose where to get lunch for the after­noon by sort­ing through 1500 list­ings for cof­fee shops and restau­rants while stand­ing on a street cor­ner in the rain in Lon­don hold­ing your phone aloft.  The func­tional aspects of AR expe­ri­ences just aren’t refined enough to han­dle the inter­ac­tion design, visu­al­iza­tion, and con­tex­tual sen­si­tiv­ity chal­lenges implied. [Pre­dic­tion: AR usage cases will nat­u­rally set­tle on a set of com­mon sce­nar­ios that bal­ance the strengths and weak­nesses of each of the four clas­sic pat­terns.  More spec­u­la­tion on that in a later post.]

Sec­ond, design­ers must address the gaps in the set of con­cepts now used as the basis for imag­in­ing new aug­mented expe­ri­ences.  I flagged six ‘miss­ing’ pat­terns in the range of expe­ri­ences offered so far; Loner, Sec­ond Hand Smoke, Pay No Atten­tion To the Man Behind the Cur­tain, The Invis­i­ble Man!, Tun­nel Vision, and AR for AR’s Sake (see the arti­cle for details).  I’m sure the very savvy read­ers of this blog can iden­tify even more.

I hope all the AR inno­va­tors, design­ers, and entre­pre­neurs work­ing hard on the crest of this break­ing wave of tech­nol­ogy find ways to take on both of these tasks.  If they can’t refine the exist­ing mod­els and fill in those expe­ri­ence gaps, then nei­ther Apple chic nor Google geek cred will suf­fice to make aug­mented real­ity viable in the long term.  And what could lit­er­ally be a new way of see­ing the world — one with legit­i­mate poten­tial for chang­ing our behav­ior with regard to urban spaces, the envi­ron­ment, social struc­tures, play, and eco­nom­ics, among just a few spheres of human activ­ity — will remain lit­tle more than a cam­era obscura style curiosity.

3 comments » | User Experience (UX)

"Interaction Design For Augmented Reality" In ReadWriteWeb

August 29th, 2009 — 1:43am

Mar­shall Kirk­patrick of Read­WriteWeb links to Inside Out: Inter­ac­tion Design for Aug­mented Real­ity (the lat­est Every­ware col­umn) in two recent sto­ries track­ing the fast-moving aug­mented real­ity space; Aug­mented Real­ity: Five Bari­ers to a Web That’s Every­where and, and Robot­Vi­sion: A Bing-powered iPhone Aug­mented Real­ity Browser

Thanks, Mar­shall!

And as a bonus, Tim O’Reilly tweeted about Marshall’s arti­cle.  I doubt that Tim reads this feed, but it’s always nice to be rec­og­nized, even indirectly.

1 comment » | Uncategorized, User Experience (UX)

Fall Speaking: Janus Boye Conference, EuroIA, BlogTalk

August 25th, 2009 — 3:23am

A quick run­down on my fall speak­ing sched­ule so far.

waffles_logoFirst up is BlogTalk 2009, in Jeju, Korea on Sep­tem­ber 15 and 16. There I’ll be talk­ing about ‘The Archi­tec­ture of Fun’ — shar­ing a new design lan­guage for emo­tion that’s been in use in the game design indus­try for quite a while.  [Dis­clo­sure: While it’s a priv­i­lege to be on the pro­gram with so many inno­v­a­tive and insight­ful social media fig­ures, I’m also really look­ing for­ward to the food in Korea :) ]

Next up is EuroIA in Copen­hagen, Sep­tem­ber 26 and 27.  For the lat­est edi­tion of this largest gath­er­ing of the user expe­ri­ence com­mu­nity in Europe, I’ll reprise my Archi­tec­ture of Fun talk.

euro_ia_2009_logo

Wrap­ping up the sched­ule so far is the Janus Boye con­fer­ence in Aarhus, Novem­ber 3 — 6.  Here  I’m pre­sent­ing a half-day tuto­r­ial titled Design­ing Infor­ma­tion Expe­ri­ences.  This is an exten­sive, detailed tuto­r­ial that any­one work­ing in infor­ma­tion man­age­ment will ben­e­fit from, as it com­bines two of my pas­sions; design­ing for peo­ple, and using frame­works to enhance solu­tion scope and effectiveness.

jboye_com_aarhus09

Here’s the descrip­tion from the offi­cial program:

When design­ing for infor­ma­tion retrieval expe­ri­ences, the cus­tomer must always be right. This tuto­r­ial will give you the tools to uncover user needs and design the con­text for deliv­er­ing infor­ma­tion, whether that be through search, tax­onomies or some­thing entirely different.

What you will learn:
•    A broadly applic­a­ble method for under­stand­ing user needs in diverse infor­ma­tion access con­texts
•    A col­lec­tion of infor­ma­tion retrieval pat­terns rel­e­vant to mul­ti­ple set­tings such as enter­prise search and infor­ma­tion access, ser­vice design, and prod­uct and plat­form management

We will also dis­cuss the impact of orga­ni­za­tional and cul­tural fac­tors on design deci­sions and why it is essen­tial, that you frame busi­ness and tech­nol­ogy chal­lenges in the right way.

The tuto­r­ial builds on lessons learned from a large cus­tomer project focus­ing on trans­form­ing user expe­ri­ence. The scope of this pro­gram included ~25 sep­a­rate web-delivered prod­ucts, a large doc­u­ment repos­i­tory, inte­grated cus­tomer ser­vice and sup­port processes, con­tent man­age­ment, tax­on­omy and ontol­ogy cre­ation, and search and infor­ma­tion retrieval solu­tions. Joe will share the inno­vate meth­ods and sur­pris­ing insight that emerged in the process.

Janus Boye gath­ers lead­ing local and inter­na­tional prac­ti­tion­ers, and is a new event for me, so I’m very much look­ing for­ward to it.

I hope to see some of you at one or more of these gath­er­ings that alto­gether span half the world!

Comment » | Uncategorized

"Inside Out: Interaction Design for Augmented Reality" Live @ UX Matters

August 19th, 2009 — 7:02am

I’m very happy to announce that Inside Out: Inter­ac­tion Design for Aug­mented Real­ity — the lat­est install­ment of my col­umn Every­ware @UX Mat­ters -  is live now.  (Tim­ing is some­times the writer’s friend, as I was at the Layar event Mon­day night here in Ams­ter­dam just the day before, and had the chance to talk with some of their team.)

AR is more of a per­spec­tive and class of expe­ri­ences than an instance of new tech­nol­ogy, so I wanted to approach the sub­ject from the spe­cific per­spec­tive of user expe­ri­ence and inter­ac­tion design.  Reac­tions from the aug­mented real­ity com­mu­nity are pos­i­tive so far; Claire Boon­stra of Layar, and no less than the inim­itable Tish Shute of Ugo­Trade, have all been kind enough to rec­om­mend it.  Thanks to them and to every­one who’s tweeted and posted this one.

As we explore the role aug­mented real­ity will play in our gigan­tic exper­i­ment with every­ware, we should keep in mind that the map is not the ter­ri­tory.  But there is no deny­ing an effec­tive map will surely help point the way as you try to find your way around a strange new coun­try.

Comment » | Everyware, User Experience (UX)

Back to top