Archive for April 2011


The Architecture of Discovery: Slides from Discover Conference 2011

April 16th, 2011 — 1:11pm

Endeca invites cus­tomers, part­ners and lead­ing mem­bers of the broader search and dis­cov­ery tech­nol­ogy and solu­tions com­mu­ni­ties to meet annu­ally, and show­case the most inter­est­ing and excit­ing work in the field of dis­cov­ery.  As lead for the UX team that designs Endeca’s dis­cov­ery prod­ucts, I shared some of our recent work on pat­terns in the struc­ture of dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions, as well as best prac­tices in infor­ma­tion design and visu­al­iza­tion that we use to drive prod­uct def­i­n­i­tion and design for Endeca’s Lat­i­tude Dis­cov­ery Framework.

This mate­r­ial is use­ful for pro­gram and project man­agers and busi­ness ana­lysts defin­ing require­ments for dis­cov­ery solu­tions and appli­ca­tions, UX and sys­tem archi­tects craft­ing high-level struc­tures and address­ing long-term growth, inter­ac­tion design­ers and tech­ni­cal devel­op­ers defin­ing and build­ing infor­ma­tion work­spaces at a fine grain, and

There are three major sec­tions: the first presents some of our tools for iden­ti­fy­ing and under­stand­ing people’s needs and goals for dis­cov­ery in terms of activ­ity (the Lan­guage of Dis­cov­ery as we call it), the sec­ond brings together screen-level, appli­ca­tion level, and user sce­nario / use-case level pat­terns we’ve observed in the appli­ca­tions cre­ated to meet those needs, and the final sec­tion shares con­densed best prac­tices and fun­da­men­tal prin­ci­ples for infor­ma­tion design and visu­al­iza­tion based on aca­d­e­mic research dis­ci­plines such as cog­ni­tive sci­ence and infor­ma­tion retrieval.

It’s no coin­ci­dence that these sec­tions reflect the appli­ca­tion of the core UX dis­ci­plines of user research, infor­ma­tion archi­tec­ture, and inter­ac­tion design to the ques­tion of “who will need to encounter infor­ma­tion for some end, and in what kind of expe­ri­ence will they encounter it”.  This flow and order­ing is delib­er­ate; it demon­strates on two lev­els the results of our own efforts apply­ing the UX per­spec­tive to the ques­tions inher­ent in cre­at­ing dis­cov­ery tools, and shares some of the tools, insights, tem­plates, and resources we use to shape the plat­form used to cre­ate dis­cov­ery expe­ri­ences across diverse industries.

Ses­sion outline

  1. Under­stand­ing User Needs
  2. Design Pat­terns for Dis­cov­ery Applications
  3. Design Prin­ci­ples and Gudielines for Infor­ma­tion Inter­ac­tion and Visualization

Ses­sion description

How can you har­ness the power and flex­i­bil­ity of Lat­i­tude to cre­ate use­ful, usable, and com­pelling dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions for enter­prise dis­cov­ery work­ers? This ses­sion goes beyond the tech­nol­ogy to explore how you can apply fun­da­men­tal prin­ci­ples of infor­ma­tion design and visu­al­iza­tion, ana­lyt­ics best prac­tices and user inter­face design pat­terns to com­pose effec­tive and com­pelling dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions that opti­mize user dis­cov­ery, suc­cess, engage­ment, & adoption.”

The pat­terns are prod­uct spe­cific in that they show how to com­pose screens and appli­ca­tions using the pre­de­fined com­po­nents in the Dis­cov­ery Frame­work library.  How­ever, many of the product-specific com­po­nents are built to address com­mon or recur­ring needs for inter­ac­tion with infor­ma­tion via well-known mech­a­nisms such as search, fil­ter­ing, nav­i­ga­tion, visu­al­iza­tion, and pre­sen­ta­tion of data.  In other words, even if you’re not using the lit­eral Dis­cov­ery Frame­work com­po­nent library to com­pose your spe­cific infor­ma­tion analy­sis work­space, you’ll find these pat­terns rel­e­vant at work­space and appli­ca­tion lev­els of scale.

The deeper story of these pat­terns is in demon­strat­ing the evo­lu­tion of dis­cov­ery and analy­sis appli­ca­tions over time.  Typ­i­cally, dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions begin by offer­ing users a general-purpose work­space that sat­is­fies a wide range of inter­ac­tion tasks in an approx­i­mate fash­ion.  Over time, via suc­ces­sive expan­sions in the the scope and vari­ety of data they present, and the dis­cov­ery and analy­sis capa­bil­i­ties they pro­vide, dis­cov­ery appli­ca­tions grow to include sev­eral dif­fer­ent types of work­spaces that indi­vid­u­ally address dis­tinct sets of needs for visu­al­iza­tion and sense mak­ing by using very dif­fer­ent com­bi­na­tions of com­po­nents.  As a com­pos­ite, these func­tional and infor­ma­tion­ally diverse work­spaces span the full range of inter­ac­tion needs for dif­fer­ing types of users.

I hope you find this toolkit and col­lec­tion of pat­terns and infor­ma­tion design prin­ci­ples use­ful.  What are some of the resources you’re using to take on these challenges?

User Expe­ri­ence Archi­tec­ture For Dis­cov­ery Appli­ca­tions from Joe Laman­tia

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